The structure and measurement of intelligence
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The structure and measurement of intelligence by Hans Jurgen Eysenck

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Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Intellect,
  • Intelligence tests,
  • Nature and nurture

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementHans J. Eysenck, with contributions by David W. Fulker.
ContributionsFulker, David W., 1937- joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBF431 .E97
The Physical Object
Pagination253 p. :
Number of Pages253
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4723087M
ISBN 100387090282
LC Control Number78010591

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In The Structure and Measurement of This classic textbook, originally published in , and now reissued with a new preface by Sybil Eysenck, incorporates a broad range of findings and reanalyzes much of the existing literature in this area.3/5(1).   In The Structure and Measurement of Intelligence, Hans Eysenck draws on methods for determining the effect of genetics and environment on the development of intelligence and examines the validity of the term as defined in relation to internal as well as external by: The Structure and Measurement of Intelligence. Authors: Eysenck, Michael Free Preview. Buy this book eB89 € price for Spain (gross) Buy eBook ISBN ; Digitally watermarked, DRM-free; Included format: PDF, EPUB; ebooks can be Brand: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. This classic textbook, originally published in , and now reissued with a new preface by Sybil Eysenck, incorporates a broad range of findings and reanalyzes much of .

) There are many good books on Intelligence, such as Cattell's () monumen­ tal and original contribution, or Matarazzo's () careful and scholarly analy­ sis, or Butchers () excellent introduction. Other outstanding contributions are mentioned in the course of this volume. The Structure and Measurement of Intelligence by Hans J. Eysenck, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life is a book by psychologist Richard J. Herrnstein and political scientist Charles Murray, in which the authors argue that human intelligence is substantially influenced by both inherited and environmental factors and that it is a better predictor of many personal outcomes, including financial income, Publisher: Free Press. In "The Structure and Measurement of Intelligence", Hans Eysenck draws on methods for determining the effect of genetics and environment on the development of intelligence and examines the validity of the term as defined in relation to internal as well as external criteria. He tests a number of hypotheses on intelligence against empirical Format: Paperback.

  One of psychology's outstanding successes has been the measurement of intelligence, and the demonstration that differences in intelligence, so measured, were due in large part to genetic factors. In recent years much work has been done to clarify the problem of the biological basis of these inherited differences, and work on the evoked potential in the Cited by: Sir Francis Galton, a pioneer in the measurement of individual differences in late nineteenth‐century England, was particularly concerned with sensory responses (visual and auditory acuity and reaction times) and their relationship to differences in ability.. Several individual tests have been used to test intelligence.. The Binet‐Simon intelligence scale, . The WISC-V is composed of 10 subtests, which comprise four indices, which then render an IQ score. The four indices are Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed. When the test is complete, individuals receive a score for each of the four indices and a Full Scale IQ score (Heaton, ). The method of. In The Structure and Measurement of Intelligence, Hans Eysenck draws on methods for determining the effect of genetics and environment on the development of intelligence and examines the validity of the term as defined in relation to internal as well as external criteria.